I was reminded of this article today, thinking about the two chimps that went to go see Dawn of the Planet of the Apes.

It’s a tearjerker, but what I’ve pasted below is the gory part. St. James is a human who was visiting his aged chimp, Moe, at an animal sanctuary for chimps. Someone didn’t latch a gate correctly.

As St. James confronted the chimp, the six-two former running back turned to find a second chimp — also a male, this one older and bigger — bearing down on him as well. With both hands, he pushed the bigger animal. Both chimps pounced. One of the animals grabbed him in a bear hug before chomping into the bone above his right eyebrow. He then stuck his finger in St. James’s right eye, gouging it out. The same animal clamped his teeth onto St. James’s nose, biting it off, as the other chimp chewed away at St. James’s fingers. In the melee, one of the chimps dug in his claws and ripped the skin off the right side of St. James’s face, causing it to flop over and cover his left eye, temporarily blinding him. One of the primates sunk his teeth into St. James’s skull. He then closed his jaws on St. James’s mouth, ripping off his lips and most of his teeth. St. James tried to put one of his hands down the animal’s throat, but the chimp just kept chewing on it and chewing on it, and he couldn’t get it out.

St. James fell to the ground, no longer able to defend himself, and for at least five minutes, the mauling continued as he lay helpless. One of the chimps gnawed on his buttocks and bit off his genitals. They ravaged his left foot, leaving it shredded. Blood poured from his body, and LaDonna was screaming. It looked as if they were eating him alive. Finally, LaDonna’s screams drew the owners’ son-in-law, Mark Carruthers, who came running armed with a .45-caliber revolver. After struggling to find a clean shot, he opened fire on the younger primate. The shot had no apparent effect, and Carruthers raced back to his house, a few dozen yards away, to reload with more-powerful ammunition. When Carruthers returned, he focused on the older male, the prime aggressor. Kneeling down, he shot him once in the head from close range. As the animal fell to the ground, the younger chimp began dragging St. James’s mutilated body down a hill leading away from Moe’s cage. Dirt filled St. James’s lungs and seeped into his bloody openings.


Forced to find new river crossing points in the Serengeti-Mara region of Eastern Africa, the wildebeest descend into individual despair and collective chaos. Fast currents and steep banks all but deny escape onto the tree-covered banks. New arrivals try unsuccessfully to scramble over the lead group that cannot climb quickly enough onto the available dry ground. Such scenes may become more common as the Great Migration faces more variable climate and narrower corridors from changing land-use. (Photo and caption by Karen Lunney/National Geographic Photo Contest)

(via 2013 National Geographic Photo Contest - Photos - The Big Picture - Boston.com)

Forced to find new river crossing points in the Serengeti-Mara region of Eastern Africa, the wildebeest descend into individual despair and collective chaos. Fast currents and steep banks all but deny escape onto the tree-covered banks. New arrivals try unsuccessfully to scramble over the lead group that cannot climb quickly enough onto the available dry ground. Such scenes may become more common as the Great Migration faces more variable climate and narrower corridors from changing land-use. (Photo and caption by Karen Lunney/National Geographic Photo Contest)

(via 2013 National Geographic Photo Contest - Photos - The Big Picture - Boston.com)