thisistheverge:

'Body Atlas' shows where emotions hit the hardest
Finnish researchers have attempted to pinpoint the ways in which our emotions affect our bodies. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, asked 773 participants to indicate how certain emotionally charged materials made them feel. The researchers argue that human bodies feel emotions in broadly consistent ways. 

To help identify your feels.

thisistheverge:

'Body Atlas' shows where emotions hit the hardest

Finnish researchers have attempted to pinpoint the ways in which our emotions affect our bodies. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, asked 773 participants to indicate how certain emotionally charged materials made them feel. The researchers argue that human bodies feel emotions in broadly consistent ways. 

To help identify your feels.

ruckawriter:

Article by Cindi May.

A photo with friends conveys the fact that you are amiable and well-liked, but oddly enough that is not what makes you more appealing. Instead, the new research shows that individual faces appear more attractive when presented in a group than when presented alone — a perceptually driven phenomenon known as the cheerleader effect.

Also interesting…

As it turns out, we find average faces very attractive. Composite faces, which are generated by averaging individual faces together, are rated as significantly more attractive than the individual faces used to create them. According to Walker and Vul, if presenting a face in a group causes us to perceive that face as more similar to the average, we are likely to find that face more attractive.

thisistheverge:

Scientists grow a miniature human brain in a lab
An incredible new development brings us closer to understanding the human mind, however: researchers have successfully grown a “mini brain” in the lab. This lab-cultivated organ represents the first time a three-dimensional brain mass with multiple, distinct regions has been created, and it could offer researchers an invaluable tool for working towards a cure for certain brain diseases. 

Huh.

Dr. Ian Malcolm: Yeah, yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn’t stop to think if they should.

thisistheverge:

Scientists grow a miniature human brain in a lab

An incredible new development brings us closer to understanding the human mind, however: researchers have successfully grown a “mini brain” in the lab. This lab-cultivated organ represents the first time a three-dimensional brain mass with multiple, distinct regions has been created, and it could offer researchers an invaluable tool for working towards a cure for certain brain diseases. 

Huh.

Dr. Ian Malcolm: Yeah, yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn’t stop to think if they should.

Life-like covers for prosthetic limbs lie atop a locker at the Center for the Intrepid (CFI), at Brooke Army Medical Center, Aug. 7, 2012. Artists paint the rubber covers, complete with custom tatoos, which slide over prosthetic arms and legs made at the center for military amputees. The CFI is the largest rehabilitation center for wounded military servicemembers suffering from amputations, burns and functional limb loss in the United States. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
(via War Veterans Recover at Brooke Army Medical Center - The Big Picture - Boston.com)

Life-like covers for prosthetic limbs lie atop a locker at the Center for the Intrepid (CFI), at Brooke Army Medical Center, Aug. 7, 2012. Artists paint the rubber covers, complete with custom tatoos, which slide over prosthetic arms and legs made at the center for military amputees. The CFI is the largest rehabilitation center for wounded military servicemembers suffering from amputations, burns and functional limb loss in the United States. (John Moore/Getty Images) #

(via War Veterans Recover at Brooke Army Medical Center - The Big Picture - Boston.com)

In which I explain the Higgs Boson to my girlfriend, who is a biologist not a physicist.

  • Alex Wright: ok, so, first I should explain what a Boson is
  • Krista: ok
  • coles notes version please
  • Alex Wright:
  • alright, so, a boson is a field mediating particle, like a photon
  • are you familiar with the electromagnetic field?
  • Krista:
  • yes
  • Alex Wright:
  • ok, so the photon is the boson that mediates the electromagnetic field.
  • the field, and force, doesn't exist without and is made up of photons. If you excite the field to a certain energy, photons are released.
  • and we can observe them
  • Krista:
  • yes I understand that
  • Alex Wright:
  • it's like when you slosh around a bucket of water and some of the water at the surface splashes up into a drop separate from the larger body of water
  • ok, so that's the basics of bosons
  • the Higgs boson is a very special type of boson
  • You know that atoms are essentially 98% empty space, yes?
  • Krista:
  • ok
  • Alex Wright:
  • you've got your nucleus, and the electrons are floating around about as far away as jupiter from the sun, if we're talking scale here.
  • Krista:
  • yes
  • I know that
  • Alex Wright:
  • so most of the universe is about 98% nothing
  • but this doesn't really make sense, because if it was truly empty, everything would be zooming around at the speed of light
  • einstein's general relativity tells us that the thing that keeps particles form zooming about at light speed is mass.
  • some particles don't have mass, like photons and electrons, which obviously travel at light speed.
  • Krista:
  • ok
  • Alex Wright:
  • but what creates mass?
  • 50 years ago, a smart guy named Peter Higgs suggested that that 98% of empty space wasn't empty at all, he hypothesized that this empty space was actually completely saturated with the Higgs Field
  • the Higgs field acts like a quantum molasses which slows down these particles as they travel through space.
  • Krista:
  • ooo cool
  • Alex Wright:
  • so, he proposed this 50 years ago, and described the phenomenon with mathematics, and it made sense
  • but the problem was, the Higgs field has such high energy, and because of Einstein's E=mc^2 equation, such high mass properties, it takes an immense amount of energy to excite the field enough to observe the particle
  • and then they did
  • Krista:
  • ohhh
  • Ok. wow I actually get it.
  • a few seconds ago
  • Alex Wright:
  • Yay
  • Krista:
  • you should post that explanation.
  • because every other one makes no sense.
thisistheverge:

Warren Ellis » The Plan To Build A Real Starship Enterprise
Obvious area of fascination: taking a fictional object and attempting to make it real as a historic feat of mega-engineering. Something that started out as a plastic model on a stick in a tv studio becoming the most expensive single object of all time.

“All he needs is 0.27% of American GDP and a few spare nuclear reactors.” - Warren Ellis

thisistheverge:

Warren Ellis » The Plan To Build A Real Starship Enterprise

Obvious area of fascination: taking a fictional object and attempting to make it real as a historic feat of mega-engineering. Something that started out as a plastic model on a stick in a tv studio becoming the most expensive single object of all time.

All he needs is 0.27% of American GDP and a few spare nuclear reactors.” - Warren Ellis

Director James Cameron has re-edited a scene for the upcoming theatrical release of Titanic 3D after an astrophysicist informed him that the star formation used during a sinking ship scene was inaccurate.

U.S. astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson sent Cameron — known for his attention to detail — an email years ago pointing out the star map used during one scene was wrong. It has since been updated.

via Mashable.com

Gimmie a fucking break.

wheel150.jpg

One of the wonderful results of networked intelligence is the revelation of the already-there. Geoglyphs. Could there be anything more there than a work of art built out of or incised into the earth itself? But the earth, she is big, and you can’t get your mind around the whole of it and apprehend its multitudinous parts, or even the small patterns they form. Well, you couldn’t, but now you can.

Thousands of geoglyph “wheels,” almost completely unknown to the public, are now part of public knowledge thanks to advances in technology, both photographic and social. These wheels are scattered across the deserts of Jordan and adjacent countries.

Science is building a better tomato moon rock.
ninakix:

In Pisa, Italy, mad genius Enrico Dini is building sandcastles on the moon. His giant 3-D printer is the first of its kind with the potential to print whole buildings, and it makes them out of solid rock, cutting down a thousand-year-long process into a few minutes. It uses sand, but someday it’ll use moon dust. … As part of the European Space Agency’s Aurora program, he’s talking with La Scuola Normale Superiore, Alta Space, and Norman Foster to modify D-Shape to build with moon dust. Voila: instant moonbase.(via Fast Company)

Science is building a better tomato moon rock.

ninakix:

In Pisa, Italy, mad genius Enrico Dini is building sandcastles on the moon. His giant 3-D printer is the first of its kind with the potential to print whole buildings, and it makes them out of solid rock, cutting down a thousand-year-long process into a few minutes. It uses sand, but someday it’ll use moon dust. … As part of the European Space Agency’s Aurora program, he’s talking with La Scuola Normale Superiore, Alta Space, and Norman Foster to modify D-Shape to build with moon dust. Voila: instant moonbase.(via Fast Company)